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Edublog Award Nominations 2009

The 2009 Edublog Awards After digging through 60+ feeds in my RSS reader, I have finally narrowed down my nominations for this years Edublog Awards.  It is getting harder and harder to choose my favorites! Best individual blog– Once Upon a Teacher because like Melanie, I am addicted to learning. Best individual tweeter– Shelly Terrell because she is always tweeting and retweeting awesome resources for education and keeps the conversation going! Best new blog- Favorite Parent because all parents should be armed with the power to make the school experience the best it can be. Best class blog– Miss McMillan’s Blog because of the ways that she engages her students with technology and love. Best student blog– EDucation ToGoBox because what is better than students recommending edtech? Best resource sharing blog – Aside from iLearn Technology Free Tech for Teachers is a must!  Great resources, especially beneficial for middle and high school. Most influential blog post– Random Musings because of Mike’s insightful look on education and the changes that must come. Most influential tweet / series of tweets / tweet based discussion– Hands down Steven Anderson for keeping us all thinking, learning, and involved in change. Best teacher blog- Math Models– Excellent ideas for the math classroom with step by step application. Best educational tech support blog– edu.Mac.nation because they understand the genius of Mac and spread that joy around. Best Library/Librarian blog- TLC = Tech + Library + Classroom because it is an excellent look at books, technology, and learning. Best elearning / corporate education blog- Love Learning because it is an excellent look at multisensory strategies to reach every child. Best educational use of audio– Cool Teachers Podcast because Chris always teaches me something new. Lifetime achievement – 2 cents worth by David Warlick. Have loved reading since I broke into edtech.

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Picturing the Thirties

Posted by admin | Posted in Fun & Games, History, Interactive Whiteboard, Language Arts, Middle/High School, Secondary Elementary, Social Studies, Teacher Resources, Virtual Field Trips, Websites | Posted on 11-10-2009

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What it is: Picturing the Thirties is another great virtual web activity from the Smithsonian.  This virtual museum exhibit teaches students about the 1930’s through eight exhibitions.  Students will learn about the Great Depression, The New Deal, The Country, Industry, Labor, The City, Leisure, and American People in the 1930’s.  Art from the Smithsonian American Art Museum are supplemented with other primary sources such as photographs, newsreels, and artist memorabilia.  Students can explore the virtual exhibits complete with museum guides that explain each exhibit to students.  The feature presentation of the museum is a series of interviews of abstract artists describing the 1930’s.  User created documentaries can be viewed from the theater’s balcony.  Students can visit the theater’s projection booth where they can find primary access and a movie making tutorial.

How to integrate Picturing the Thirties into the classroom: I am always amazed by the virtual content that the Smithsonian has produced.  Picturing the Thirties is an incredible virtual field trip to museum exhibits that will put your students face to face with primary resources that will help them understand the events and culture of the 1930’s.  This is SO much better than learning from a textbook!  This interactive site is a great way for students to explore the 1930’s and learn at their own pace.  This site is perfect for the computer lab environment where every student has access to a computer.  You could also take a class virtual field trip to the museum using an interactive whiteboard or a projector.

Tips: Make sure that students have headphones or speakers for this website, there is quite a bit of audio content.

Related Resources: Smithsonian Virtual Museum, UPM Virtual Forest, efield Trips

Leave a comment and tell us how you are using Picturing the Thirties in your classroom.

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