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Last day to enter for a Koostik! #technologymadenatural

Today is your last chance to enter the Koostik giveaway! Winner will be announced tomorrow   The winner should receive their Koostik just in time for the holidays. Happy things. Details for this giveaway below: I’m particularly fond of small business shopping because my family has always owned small businesses. My dad is the ultimate craftsman. He is always dreaming up new inventions and he uses one of my favorite mediums to carry out those inventions: beautiful cuts of wood. There is something about having wood in your home, it evokes feelings of warmth and a connection to nature. When my dad started Koostik, I was especially excited because it connects technology (which you know I love) with the natural beauty of wood. These are not just functional, they are truly pieces of art. Each Koostik is handmade and unique.  Because no cut of wood is exactly the same, each one has a slightly different feel.  Every time I visit the shop I want to take more product home.  I constantly get the, “but Kelly, you already have a Pivot.” My response, “I know but it isn’t THIS Pivot in the Ambrosia Maple!” Koostik is a true small business.  My dad works on the woodwork with a few other guys in his shop, and my mom does the finishing and packaging. My brother works sales and does all the photography and website design. There is a passion and attention to detail that you find in small businesses that just doesn’t exist anywhere else. I support small business because I appreciate that attention to detail. I appreciate the craftsmanship and passion that go into every product. I like knowing that I am supporting a neighbor, a family. I’m offering a giveaway for the Koostik product of your choice. Sorry international friends, this one is for US citizens only! To enter you will need to do one (or all) of the following: Tweet about Koostik with the hash tag #technologymadenatural and a link to this post OR http://koostik.com Pin your favorite Koostik product on Pinterest. Make sure to use the hash tag #technologymadenatural with your pin. “Like” Koostik on Facebook and leave a comment with #technologymadenatural Put a picture of your favorite Koostik in your Instagram feed with the hash tag #technologymadenatural A winner will be chosen on December 7, 2013.  Hurry and get as many entries in as you can! The winner will be announced on iLearn Technology and contacted through the social media that you used to enter.  

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Critical Past

Posted by admin | Posted in Analyze, Evaluate, Geography, Government, History, Interactive Whiteboard, Knowledge (remember), Middle/High School, Primary Elementary, Secondary Elementary, Social Studies, Teacher Resources, Understand (describe, explain), video, Websites | Posted on 10-08-2010

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What it is: Critical Past is a website I learned about today from Tom Boito’s great blog EDge 21 in his Catch of the Day.  The resource is too good not to share again here!  Critical Past is a collection of more than 57,000 historical videos and more than 7 million historical photos.  All of the photos and videos are royalty free, archival stock footage.  Most of the footage comes from U.S. Government Agency sources.  All of the videos and photos can be viewed for free online and shared with others via url, Twitter, or Facebook.  The videos and photos are also available to purchase for download.

How to integrate Critical Past into your curriculum: Critical Past is an incredible collection of historical videos and pictures.  The site is easy to search either by decade and topic or keyword.  The clips and photos on Critical Past will bring historical events alive for your students.  Use photos or videos on Critical Past to help illustrate what students are learning in history.  Ask students to be “eyewitnesses” of history and watch a video before they have context for it.  Students can write or blog about what they think they are witnessing, afterward they can research the event more in-depth and write a follow-up reflection on what was actually happening in the clip.

** Check out this awesome lesson that @pharesr created based on this post. So cool!

Tips: Along the right side bar of Critical Past, you will find “related videos.”  Students can watch a clip and the related videos and reflect on how the clips are related.  Sometimes it is a similar time period, sometimes a related event, other times it is a related location.

Please leave a comment and share how you are using Critical Past in your classroom!

Comments (14)

I love this website! Thank you so much for sharing!

[…] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Shelly S Terrell, ktenkely, Maryna Badenhorst, njbrand, Rita Simons Santiago and others. Rita Simons Santiago said: RT @ShellTerrell Critical Past http://bit.ly/cDR8S4 by @ktenkely #edtech […]

Wow – what an amazing resource. I will use this to help my kids find primary sources for the projects they do for the National History Day contest. It will be especially useful for those making documentaries or websites as for a small fee they can get video footage and photos.

[…] Past Critical Past is a great site that I just learned about from iLearn Technology. This is a site that is dedicated to showing excellent historic photos and videos. It works very […]

This is a tremendous resource! I will definitely use it for our U.S. History Documentary film project. There are lots of newsreels here, and it’s the best source of Bob Hope/USO footage from WWII I’ve seen in one place. Thanks for posting!

Thanks for the mention!

Great Primary Source for showing what the world looked like at various years. Lots of background information for Social Studies and some chapter books.

I agree, this would be a great way to enrich text and chapter books!

You bet!

Great idea Meryl! I hope you will share the projects with the rest of us, I know I would love to see them!

This site is amazing! I’m passing this along ASAP to all of the teachers in my district. Thanks Kelly!

It would be a great service if only they weren’t ripping people off. The pricing is ridiculous considering they are selling footage paid for by US taxpayers. To charge $170 for a 50 second clip recorded in the 1940′s is a joke. This information should be available at a decent price…it’s OUR history.

Hi Matt, agreed! The service USED to be completely free of charge. Not such a great service when it is expensive beyond reason.

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