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Little Bird Tales

What it is: I am late on this post, but it is too good to skip a mention!  Little Bird Tales is a new way to digital story tell with primary students.  With Little Bird Tales, students can upload their own artwork, record their voice, add text and email their finished creations to family and friends. Sign up on Little Bird Tales requires an email address for verification purposes.  This can be a parent or teacher email address (the site is geared for 3 to 14-year-old children so a student address is not necessary).  Little Bird Tales includes a built-in art pad where students can create pictures online.  They also have the option to upload photographs and images they have created offline.  Each page give students a place to add a picture, text and voice recording.  Finished books can be saved and accessed online or sent via email. How to integrate Little Bird Tales into the classroom: Little Bird Tales is a brilliant option for digital storytelling in the primary classroom.  I love that it includes both online and offline student creations, as well as student voice recordings.  Students can use Little Bird Tales for creative writing and imaginative stories, as a way to reflect on learning, or as a keepsake for parents.  Students can take pictures of science experiments and create a digital science journal detailing the experiment with text and student voice reflections included. Use Little Bird Tales to create whole class stories where each student contributes a page.  This type of book can be made over a few weeks using classroom computers as a writing center.  This would be a fun way to create an A to Z type book of learning, reflections by students after a unit, a 100 day book, fact vs. opinion book, an interactive glossary, a class book of poems, a phonics book, or a class book about a field trip that students took.  The finished product can be shared with parents and families easily through an email. For a back to school night activity, take a picture of each student to add to a class book and record students sharing what their favorite part of the school day is.  This same idea could be used in preparation for parent-teacher conferences. Students can upload pictures of their best school work, record thoughts about why they are proud of the work they did, and add reflections in the text field.  These can be shared as a starting point for conferences, at the end of the conference, parents have a keepsake. Because of the voice recording capabilities, Little Bird Tales, would be a great way for students to practice a foreign language.  They can illustrate a word or phrase accompanied by the audio.  Classes could work together to create a “living” digital glossary. Do you have a planned absence coming?  Why not create a digital story that your substitute can share with students?  Upload pictures that support learning, text, and your voice. Tips: If you have parent email addresses in Google, Yahoo, or Outlook, they can be directly imported into Little Bird Tales as contacts. Please leave a comment and share how you are using Little Bird Tales in your classroom!

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Friday Recap

Posted by admin | Posted in Friday Recap | Posted on 27-05-2011

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Three day weekends are a gift straight from heaven!  I could not be more thrilled that we are headed into one of those.  I have been on turbo speed for the past few months and I need a reason to take a forced break- this seems like the perfect excuse to do just that!

Working to open a school in August is hard work, I continue to be amazed at the learning community that is being pulled together and I am excited to see it all unfold!

This week:

I hope you had a meaningful week full of many learning gifts.  To those who finished school this week-congratulations! For those who have some time yet- keep doing what is best for kids!

Happy weekend!

Comments (2)

I love your Searching For da Vinci resource! It’s exactly what I was thinking when I wrote my first blog post on da Vinci. The Bloom’s Taxonomy visuals are great, too! I’d like to hear more about what you are doing with it. Thanks for sharing.

Thanks Peggy, as you will remember your post was the inspiration for this line of thought!

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