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iPads in Education

Some of you may know that I am working on an iPad 1-to-1 pilot program for first and fifth grade students at the school where I teach.  The program will study the effects of the mobile device on learning and achievement in the math and reading/language arts classroom.  One of my PLN members, Jason Schmidt will be working with us as a part of his masters program.  Additionally, Robert Marzano and Debra Pickering from the Marzano Research Institute, have agreed to partner with us in research if we can get the funding all settled.  Which brings me to the point of this post.  I still have to fund the thing!  I am waiting to hear back on several leads but never the one to only have one marshmallow in the fire, I am looking at every method conceivable to find the money for this. This morning my mom sent me a Kohls Cares for Schools contest email that is offering $500,000 to the 20 schools with the most votes by September 3.  Of course I promptly signed up for it and am counting on all of you to help me out.  You are given a total of 20 votes that you can use, but you can only use 5 votes per school.  So I am asking for 5 of your votes to help fund the iPads in education study.  It is simple and just takes a one time click to connect and then 5 clicks of the votes button.  Easy right?  So, would you give us a hand and help us put some research to the iPads in the classroom debate? One of the fun outcomes of this little idea is the comments that students have started leaving about how they think that the iPad could be used in the classroom.  Pretty fun to see from the students point of view Two side notes: 1.  I have an iLearn Technology fan page on Facebook, if you haven’t already become a fan and clicked “like” you can do that here. 2. If you have a contact that could help with funding, I would take that too Thank you all for your help and support!  If you are so inclined, you can also tweet about this post and ask others in your PLN to help vote.

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Dance, Factors Dance: Animated Factorization Diagrams #mathchat

Posted by admin | Posted in Analyze, Art, Evaluate, Interactive Whiteboard, Knowledge (remember), Math, Middle/High School, Primary Elementary, Secondary Elementary, Teacher Resources, Understand (describe, explain), video, Websites | Posted on 15-11-2012

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What it is:  Dance, Factors Dance is a fantastic site to visualize factorization diagrams.  The first “tango” is inspired by the digital clock, with a separate diagram for each of the hours, minutes and seconds.  The Factor Conga is a “promenade of primes, composites, and their constituents, arranged with an aesthetically-tuned variation of Yorgey’s rules, one per second.”  I love the way these math factorization dances help students visualize numbers and Prime numbers.  Brilliant!

How to integrate Dance, Factors Dance into the classroom: Dance, Factor Dance is a stupendous way for students to visualize and think about numbers.  I Love the way that the prime numbers are depicted…so easy to see why it is a prime number!  Ask your students to explore this site and identify the patterns they notice in the dance of numbers.  What happens when a number is prime?  When a number is odd?  Even?

Dance, Factors Dance is a fun way to learn more about numbers, it is also a wonderful inspiration for finding the art in math.  How can students use the site as inspiration to create their own math dance?  Could they use stop motion animation and manipulatives to do something similar?  What patterns in math do they notice?  How can they use color and design to help them better understand math?

This site is a great one to explore as a class, as a center on classroom computers, or individually on student devices.  Students can pause the dance, rewind, and fast forward as they explore.

Tips: Be sure to watch (or fast forward) to the three digit numbers…this is where things get really impressive!  As a side note, I learned something today from a fellow teacher.  When looking at numbers in grid form, you know if a number is prime if it can only make one rectangle.  This understanding would have been helpful in math class! Better late than never :)

Leave a comment and tell us how you are using  Dance, Factors Dance in your classroom.

Comments (1)

We have already taught this concept, but this is a perfect way to reinforce it! Thanks!

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