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The Adjective Detective

What it is: The Adjective Detective is a fun way for your students to learn more about adjectives, superlative adjectives, and comparative adjectives.  This interactive learning module, game, and quiz comes from the Children’s University of Manchester site (I have written about it before here).  Last week I was searching high and low for some good adjective interactives for my students and was pleasantly surprised to rediscover this one.  I knew if the activity had fallen off of my radar, chances were that others had forgotten it, too.  The Adjective Detecive offers students a in-depth, interactive mini lesson on adjectives, superlative adjectives, and comparative adjectives.  After students work their way through the lessons, they can play an adjective game as a detective.  They must hunt down adjectives in the sentence by clicking on it with their magnifying glass.  Students recieve immediate feedback on their answer.  When they are finished playing the game, students can answer multiple choice questions about adjectives in an online quiz. How to integrate Adjective Detective into the classroom: Use the Adjective Detective mini-lessons to teach your whole class about adjectives.  Put the site up on your interactive whiteboard or projector and discuss the different kinds of adjectives with your students.  The site could also be used for self guided learning (I am personally a big advocate of this!) as a computer center in the classroom or individually in the lab setting.  After students complete the mini lessons, encourage them to play the adjective detective game.  In my classroom I want students to enter the spirit of play and have a few detective hats, magnifying glasses, and mini notebooks.  Students can play “detective”, hunting down adjectives in sentences.  On the interactive whiteboard, the student at the board can find an adjective that the rest of the class writes down as an adjective clue in their notebooks.  Then we pass the detective job onto the next student, until all of the adjectives in the game have been discovered.  You could alternatively send students to the classroom computers as a grammar center where the students become “detectives” and jot down their adjective clues while they are at the center.  The multiple choice quiz lends itself nicely to assessing understanding with clickers (student response systems).  The quiz can also be taken individually on the classroom computers.  I like learning sites, like this, that allow students to work through learning at their own pace and offer immediate feedback so that students can monitor their own understanding. Tips: Check out the rest of the Children’s University of Manchester website for other good interative lessons. Please leave a comment and share how you are using The Adjective Detective in your classroom.

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Student Freelance: connecting talented students with employers for freelance work

Posted by admin | Posted in Apply, collaboration, Middle/High School, Subject, Teacher Resources, Web2.0 | Posted on 27-06-2013

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Student Freelance via iLearn Technology

What it is:  Student Freelance aims to connect talented American educated students (sorry, for now this is US only) with employers who want to utilize those talents.  Students get an opportunity to put their talents and passions to work while earning money, gaining experience, and making connections with others in their fields of interest.  Employers win because they get a cost-effective solution and the opportunity to scale up.  The added benefit is the apprenticeship opportunity that exists here.

How to integrate Student Freelance into the classroom: If your students are anything like ours, they are wildly talented and passionate.  They continue to amaze me with the ways that they push themselves to learn in areas of passion.  I’ve had several students ask if I could connect them with someone at Google or Pixar so they can start putting their skills to work. :)  While I don’t always have that ability, I can now point them to Student Freelance.  This offers students the ability to share their skills and passions with the world, while becoming contributing citizens now.  It is also a great opportunity for your students to begin building up an authentic work-experience portfolio while they are still in school as learners.

Jobs are listed by areas of skill expertise and passion.  The opportunity can be a freelance job on location, or in some cases, a freelance job that they can complete from anywhere in the US by connecting online.

I’m looking through all of the freelance offerings of students and wondering…could schools utilize these students as a sort of adjunct teacher/mentor for students at their own school?  This could be a cool way to support students and make valuable connections.

Tips:  Spread the word to local businesses that Student Freelance is an option!  I’m not sure most business owners would know to look here.  It is a great mission to support!

Are you using Student Freelance?  Share your experience in the comments below!

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