Featured Post

Bloom’s Taxonomy Bloomin’ Tree

Okay, here is my LAST Bloom’s re-imagine (although I’m not promising it is the last that I will come up with, it is just the last I created for my classroom). Over the past few weeks I have been sharing some of my Boom’s Taxonomy re-imagines.  I created these for my classroom so that I could share Bloom’s with my kids in different ways that would make our classroom fun, but also give them a different way of viewing the information.   Today I am sharing my Bloomin’ Tree.  As I started making my Bloom’s re-imagines, students started coming to me with ideas of how to display the information.  The tree was a student idea and the boy underneath is Lance, who made the suggestion.  (Lance was my personal Dennis the Menace, loved him to pieces!)  Some of you have asked what program I used to create my pictures.  I use Apple’s Pages for almost everything, the Bloom’s Taxonomy was no exception.  I use the free hand drawing tool, the shapes, fill tool, text box, and inspector to make my version of Bloom’s Taxonomy. Below you will find my original Bloomin’ Tree, along with my digital version.  Many of you have asked for a printable version of these Bloom’s Taxonomy re-imagines, you can now find a bundle of 4 (Bloomin’ Peacock, Um-bloom-ra, Bloomin’ Pinwheel, and Bloomin’ Tree) in my store.  You will get 8 8.5″x11″ posters, this includes the digital version of each. Digital Bloomin’ Tree Here are links to the digital resources in my digital Bloomin’ Tree: Remember: BBC Skillwise- http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/ Spelling City- http://spellingcity.com Starfall- http://starfall.com Discovery Streaming- http://streaming.discoveryeducation.com Lexipedia- http://lexipedia.com YouTube- http://youtube.com Gamegoo- http://www.earobics.com/gamegoo/gooey.html PBS Kids- http://pbskids.org Understand: Into the Book- http://reading.ecb.org Skype- http://skype.com Treasures- http://activities.macmillanmh.com/reading/treasures/ Book Adventure- http://bookadventure.org Twitter- http://twitter.com Apply: Kerpoof- http://kerpoof.com PhotoBooth- Software Scholastic- http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/learn.jsp Fotobabble- http://fotobabble.com Google Earth- http://google.com/earth Analyze: Read Write Think- http://readwritethink.org Cool Iris- http://cooliris.com Wordle- http://wordle.net Creaza- http://creaza.com Mindomo- http://mindomo.com Evaluate: Shelfari- http://shelfari.com Wikipedia- http://wikipedia.com Think.com- http://think.com Nota- http://notaland.com Create: Pic-Lits- http://piclits.com Kerpoof- http://kerpoof.com ZimmerTwins- http://zimmertwins.com Wiki Spaces- http://wikispaces.com DomoNation- http://domonation.com Glogster- http://edu.glogster.com Creaza- http://creaza.com Voicethread- http://voicethread.com Kidblog- http://kidblog.org Wetpaint- http://www.wetpaint.com edublogs- http://edublogs.org Stage’d- http://stagedproject.com/ Garageband- Software iMovie- Software  

Read More

Museum Box

Posted by admin | Posted in Geography, History, inspiration, Language Arts, Middle/High School, Primary Elementary, Secondary Elementary, Social Studies, Teacher Resources, Virtual Field Trips, Web2.0, Websites | Posted on 06-01-2009

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

1

What it is:    Museum Box is a website that I heard about through a tweet on Twitter a few weeks ago that is really impressing me today (that is saying a lot since today is MacWorld and they are announcing big things!).  Museum Box is based on the work of Thomas Clarkson who collected items in a box to help him in his argument for the abolition of slavery.  He collected items in a box to demonstrate to others the fine craftsmanship and abilities of the African culture.  He used his box as a sort of travelling museum to aid him in his debate.  The Museum Box website provides a place for students to collect information and arguments in a virtual museum box of their own.  They can collect items to provide a description or add to an argument of a historical event, place, or time period.  Students can add images, text, sounds, video, external links, etc. to each compartment of the box helping them form their own virtual museum.  The Museum Box can be shared as a presentation, saved, or printed.  After a box has been created, students can view one anothers boxes and leave comments about the box.  You really have to check this one out!  So neat for history and literature classes!

 

How to integrate Museum Box into the classroom:  Use Museum Box as a medium for students to learn about and collect information about a historical event, person, or time period.  Because students can upload their own content to Museum Box, you might also have them create a box all about them.  This would be a great way for students to get to know each other at the beginning of the year.  Museum box is a neat way to share information about geography, students can make a box all about a place including items in their box that are unique to that place.  The ability to incorporate text, sounds, images, video, and uploaded items makes Museum Box especially impressive!  After students have created boxes, spend time viewing other’s boxes and leaving comments about the box.  This is kind of like a science fair atmosphere for history, geography, and literature.   Yet another tool I wish I had in school!

 

Tips:  Introduce Museum Box to your students by learning about Thomas Clarkson, he is a very interesting historical figure that I had never heard of!

 

Leave a comment and tell us how you are using Museum Box in your classroom.

Comments (1)

Hi Kelly,
Just wanted you to know that I recommended this website to a few teachers after seeing it here and they flipped over it! One is going to use it immediately as the wrap-up activity for a WWI project her class is just finishing and several others are collaborating on a unit about a BC gold rush town called Barkerville. In addition, another teacher just finished a unit on Underground to Canada and another just finished up a wiki on To Kill a Mockingbird, so Clarkson’s story and box will make a nice addition to their units. Thanks so much for posting these excellent resources. You might not always hear from us, but I assure you we’re very appreciative of all your great, practical ideas.
Mallory

Write a comment

*