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Students Rebuild: Paper Cranes for Japan

What it is: As news of Japan’s tsunami and earthquake(s) continues to roll in, students may be feeling overwhelmed by the devastation of it all.  Following natural disaster current events can give students (and adults) a real sense of helplessness.  As adults, we often ease this by donating money or time.  What do students do to make an impact? Today I learned of a truly wonderful site called Students Rebuild from a tweet from my friend @MZimmer557.  Students Rebuild is a site that helps students around the world connect, learn, and take action on critical global issues.  There are a few projects that students can get involved in currently: 1. Haiti- building stronger, permanent schools in Haiti.  This is a call to action for middle and high school students to rebuild strong, permanent schools in Haiti following the 2010 earthquake.  Students and educators create a team to raise money.  Any money raised is matched dollar-for-dollar up to $2,500 per team. 2. Japan-folding cranes to support rebuilding in Sendai.  This is a way for young students to take action.  “Through a simple, powerful gesture of making and mailing in a paper crane, students worldwide are promoting hope, healing, and triggering dollars for reconstruction ($2 for each crane received).” Students Rebuild gives students the opportunity to connect to a global community, learn about the challenges of a natural disaster, and do something real to make a difference. In addition to the Rebuild challenges, educators can use Student Rebuild to connect students with others around the world.  The site helps build that global learning community  Interactive video conferencing encourages two-way dialogue and emotional connections.  Webcasts between Haiti and multiple schools around the world engage, and inspire.  (Learn more on the “Educators” page) How to integrate Students Rebuild into the classroom: Register your class to take part in one of the Students Rebuild activities.  The newest way to take part is through the Paper Cranes for Japan project.  Students Rebuild partnered with DoSomething.org to give students worldwide a way to support their Japanese peers.  Start by watching the video of how to make paper cranes on the Students Rebuild website.  Take a photo and upload it with a message to the Paper Cranes for Japan Facebook Page.  Mail the finished paper cranes to Students Rebuild to turn those cranes into dollars for reconstruction and an art installation.  This would be a great project to take on as a class.  Don’t stop there, encourage your students to make more paper cranes.  They can have a paper crane party, or encourage their families to join in on the paper crane creation.  Download the one-page flier to send home with students. Using Students Rebuild projects in your classroom is a great way to teach students about our global community, empathy, current events, and give students a way to make a difference. Tips: Be sure to check out the comprehensive toolkit on the Students Rebuild site.  In the toolkit you will find photos, videos, posters, fact sheets, logos, media coverage, and fundraising tips. Please leave a comment and share how you are using Students Rebuild in your classroom!

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Ekoloko

Posted by admin | Posted in Character Education, Fun & Games, inspiration, Secondary Elementary, Social Studies, Web2.0, Websites | Posted on 20-05-2009

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What it is: Ekoloko is a virtual world for kids.  In Ekoloko students discover the world, both real and virtual, through fun games and quests.  As they play in Ekoloko, students learn and build values, character qualities, knowledge and skills that help them become more responsible and involved individuals.  Students learn to respect each other and the environment in the safe online community.  While students are in Ekoloko, they are faced with dealing with other characters that are interested in exploring the resources of the world for their own personal benefit.

How to integrate Ekoloko into the classroom:  This safe virtual world is a great place for students to practice their netiquette in a controlled environment.  In Ekoloko, character qualities are valued, leadership and responsiblity are encouraged.  This is a great way for students to learn how to be good online (and offline) citizens.  Along the way, students can also practice being good stewards of the environment.  Ekoloko reminds me of  and would be another great site to introduce to students in preparation for Earth Day.  I really appreciate the character values encouraged by this site.

 

Tips:  To view the site in English, select English as the language in the bottom right corner of the site.

 

Leave a comment and tell us how you are using Ekoloko in your classroom.

Comments (2)

I just checked out this website and I’m already finding tons of ways this could be incorporated into my classroom. It’s amazing how many different sites you have introduced to me. A fellow colleague of mine and I are always talking about your newest posts. I appreciate the work you are doing.

I can’t find a button that lets me turn it to English. I know you mention it is at the lower right hand corner – but I am not seeing anything. It sounds really interesting so I’d love to take a look!

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