Featured Post

Using the Common Core Standards Scandalously to Bring Freedom to Learn

At Anastasis Academy we use the Common Core Standards as a basic framework to start from.  We don’t purchase ANY boxed curriculum. At all.  At least not in the typical fashion.  We tailor learning to meet the needs of our students.  All of the resources we purchase are purchased with specific students in mind.  So, if a piece of curriculum meets the needs of a student, we purchase that.  If a lesson plan, or a video, or a book, or an app helps that child to be successful in learning, we purchase that. The Common Core Standards act as our guide not our goal.   I know, scandalous. We don’t see the Common Core Standards as needing to be prescriptive of when and how a child should learn.  Instead, we recognize that there are some foundational, basic skills in learning that help students in other learning, discovery and creativity.  Quite frankly, the Common Core Standards are underwhelming. They leave SO much to be desired if they are viewed as the learning objective. If viewed as a baseline, a door to other learning opportunities, everything changes.  There is freedom in that. At Anastasis, we don’t have grade levels.  Instead we group students based on developmental level taking into account academic abilities, the social/emotional and maturation.  In any given class, we could have up to a 3-4 year spread.  We recognize that children don’t develop at exactly the same rate.  They must be given flexibility in their learning and not forced through a curriculum based on an artificial pacing guide.  We believe the same is true for the standards.  While the standards give a nice framework, there is no reason why a 6 year old should be expected to master all of the standards in first grade.  There is no reason why a 6 year old should be limited by the standards in first grade.  I’m sure that we don’t use the Common Core Standards quite like anyone else.  We pay little attention to the grade level of the standard.  Instead, when a child has mastered a standard, we move them to the next level of challenge regardless of the grade level the standard falls in.  Because every child in a class could be working on a different combination of standards, we have a very low teacher/student ratio.  We have 12 students to every teacher.  This allows us to truly work with students where they are at.  We use Mastery Connect to help us keep track of student progress. Our students are involved in the process of coming up with learning goals.  I know in most cases this responsibility rests solely on the shoulders of the teacher or the curriculum company.  Students should have a say in their learning.  If they don’t, we are doing a disservice to them.  The problem we quickly ran into: students couldn’t easily read and understand the standards so that they could weigh in.  Have you read the Common Core Standards? They are ridiculously full of eduspeak BS.  I mean honestly, do they have to make everything sound so convoluted? I ended up rewriting the standards in student friendly language so that our students could work with teachers to create learning goals for each block (five week period).  Below, you can see my re-written versions for first-sixth grade standards.  I’m going back through the seventh and eighth grade standards for some additional tweaking. First Open publication – Free publishing – More 1st grade Second Open publication – Free publishing Third Open publication – Free publishing Fourth Open publication – Free publishing Fifth Open publication – Free publishing Sixth Open publication – Free publishing Our students are so brilliant in the way they plan their goals for each block.  One of our intermediate students showed me a video yesterday that he put together to show which standards and goals he had set for himself and his action steps to get there.  It is seriously creative.  As soon as he has it uploaded to YouTube I’ll share. Whoever decided that standards should be printed out and posted during the lesson that addresses them should be ashamed.  Who is that for, honestly?  The standard cards that get posted are full of the eduspeak. They aren’t for students. Standards have gotten a bad reputation in the education community.  The way they are being used is distasteful to say the least.  Standards are being used to make every learning experience look exactly the same regardless of the child. They are being used to sell curriculum.  They are being used to help students pass a test. They are being used to judge teacher abilities. They are being used to determine funding. They are being used to churn out a generation of kids that have the exact same skill set. I like standards.  I like that there are food standards that ensure that the food I eat is safe.  I like that those standards don’t dictate which dishes end up on my table. I like that they don’t hinder chefs from being creative with food.  I like that there are standards for the safety of children’s toys.  I like that those standards don’t dictate how creative a toy maker can be.  I like that they don’t dictate how a child can play.  I like that there are standards in the construction of my house. I like that those standards don’t keep me from personalizing my house.  I like that those standards leave plenty of room for creative architecture and design.  Standards that are used as a framework and baseline allow for freedom.  They give us a starting place and let us create and work all the way around them.  When you view the Common Core Standards this way, they aren’t mind numbing, they are freeing.  They help us empower students with the building blocks of learning so that they have freedom in learning. They give students enough of the skills and foundational understandings to build on in any direction they would like. I realize that this view of the Common Core Standards isn’t where most of you are.  For most of you the standards are very prescriptive. Very limiting. A very narrow view of what it means to be educated.  My hope is that by sharing the way we scandalously use the standards, other classrooms and schools will be able to make changes toward freedom in learning.  My hope is that more schools would break free from the boxed curricula and testing.  Students should experience freedom in their learning.  All teachers should experience the freedom that comes with really being a teacher (as opposed to script reader and test giver). If I could change one thing about the Common Core Standards it would be this: get rid of the grade level separation of standards.  Let it just be a continuum of learning.  It is so silly to think that children should be able to master learning because according to the standard, they are the age for it. It is so silly to think that a student couldn’t possibly master standards well above their age.  I call BS on both. We have students who exist in both camps. Our goal is to empower students as learners.  Our goal is to do what is right for every child.  Our goal is freedom in learning.    

Read More

Bloom’s Taxonomy: Bloomin’ Peacock

Posted by admin | Posted in Analyze, Apply, Blogs, Blooms Taxonomy, Create, Evaluate, Knowledge (remember), Primary Elementary, professional development, Secondary Elementary, Teacher Resources, Understand (describe, explain), Web2.0 | Posted on 30-08-2010

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

83

Tomorrow I am doing a training on the Treasures Supplement that I created over the summer.  Most of the supplemental suggestions fall into the bottom two tiers of Bloom’s Taxonomy (Remember and Understand).  I want to show teachers that just because these activities help students practice basic skills and remember and understand, there are SO many more options that will reach the higher levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy!  I created the Bloomin’ Peacock to show teachers the Blooms Taxonomy break down and the Bloomin’ digital Peacock that shows how the digital tools in the supplement break down.

Below are the tools listed in my Bloomin’ Digital Peacock

Bloomin' Digital Peacock

Remember:

BBC Skillwise- http://www.bbc.co.uk/skillswise/

Spelling City- http://spellingcity.com

Starfall- http://starfall.com

Discovery Streaming- http://streaming.discoveryeducation.com

Lexipedia- http://lexipedia.com

YouTube- http://youtube.com

Gamegoo- http://www.earobics.com/gamegoo/gooey.html

PBS Kids- http://pbskids.org

Understand:

Into the Book- http://reading.ecb.org

Skype- http://skype.com

Treasures- http://activities.macmillanmh.com/reading/treasures/

Book Adventure- http://bookadventure.org

Twitter- http://twitter.com

Apply:

Kerpoof- http://kerpoof.com

PhotoBooth- Software

Scholastic- http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/learn.jsp

Fotobabble- http://fotobabble.com

Google Earth- http://google.com/earth

Analyze:

Read Write Think- http://readwritethink.org

Cool Iris- http://cooliris.com

Wordle- http://wordle.net

Creaza- http://creaza.com

Mindomo- http://mindomo.com

Evaluate:

Shelfari- http://shelfari.com

Wikipedia- http://wikipedia.com

Think.com- http://think.com

Nota- http://notaland.com

Create:

Pic-Lits- http://piclits.com

Kerpoof- http://kerpoof.com

ZimmerTwins- http://zimmertwins.com

Wiki Spaces- http://wikispaces.com

DomoNation- http://domonation.com

Glogster- http://edu.glogster.com

Creaza- http://creaza.com

Voicethread- http://voicethread.com

Kidblog- http://kidblog.org

Wetpaint- http://www.wetpaint.com

edublogs- http://edublogs.org

Stage’d- http://stagedproject.com/

Garageband- Software

iMovie- Software

I have received a lot of requests and DM’s for the Bloomin’ Peacock on posters (I’m still working on these), mugs, etc.  For those of you who asked, here it is:

Comments (83)

[...] have just learned of the work by Kelly Tenkely (http://ilearntechnology.com/ ) and her Bloomin’ Digital Peacock. This is a fabulous resource for teachers, both novice and expert. Any discussion around web 2.0 [...]

[...] Bloom’s taxonomy is instrumental in helping us to develop guidelines for the creation of appropriate objectives and their supporting instructional strategies. Not all objectives are the same. Different objectives focus on different performances and outcomes. Different types of objectives require different types of strategies. Instructional design is made easier by assigning learning objectives to different categories. Each category leads to a different class of human performance and also requires a different set of instructional conditions for effective learning. By correctly identifying the learning level of an objective, strategies can then be developed to ensure that the content is presented clearly and appropriately for E-learning, and that the instruction will be effective. [...]

I am in LOVE of your site and JEALOUS we don’t have you on staff for training and ideas!!

We are trying to put together an online document for Multiple Intelligences and we have been brainstorming several different ideas. I found your bloomin’ peacock and loved it. Do you have a printable version or an interactive version of the web 2.0 tools one with live links? If so, are you willing to share?

:D Thanks Stacy!
I do have a printable version of my peacocks, you can purchase a printable version from my store http://ilearntechnology.com/?page_id=2875 , all 8 posters are bundled for $0.99. If you want to use them school wide it is $20.99. The interactive version is online only in the form of this post.

[...] http://ilearntechnology.com/?p=2973 This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. ← ALTERNATIVES TO YOUTUBE [...]

[...] Bloomin’ Peacock [...]

[...] Bloomin’ Peacock, Bloomin’ Pinwheel, Un-bloom-ra, Bloomin’ Tree (these are Web 2.0 tools that have been divided into Bloom’s Taxonomy… but the idea is great!!!!) All Shakespeare info compiled from Wikipedia, Blurtit, Brandon Powell, & Yahoo Answers.  Consider extending the Shakespeare activity by asking the question, “How has Shakespeare influenced modern day society?”. Students can extend the web with more topics and descriptions: [...]

[...] Bloomin’ Peacock, Bloomin’ Pinwheel, Un-bloom-ra, Bloomin’ Tree (these are Web 2.0 tools that have been divided into Bloom’s Taxonomy… but the idea is great!!!!). These could be used in conjunction with many of the iPad lessons listed. [...]

[...] iLearn Technology » Blog Archive » Bloom’s Taxonomy: Bloomin’ Peacock Kelly Tenkeley published the Bloomin' Digital Pacock on the iLearn Technology blog Source: ilearntechnology.com [...]

[...] http://ilearntechnology.com/?p=2973 This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. ← WORDLE!!!! [...]

[...] Bloom’s Taxonomy: Bloomin’ Peacock [...]

[...] iLearn Technology » Blog Archive » Bloom’s Taxonomy: Bloomin’ Peacock Source: ilearntechnology.com [...]

[...] Bloom’s Taxonomy: Bloomin’ Peacock [...]

[...] iLearn Technology » Bloom’s Taxonomy: Bloomin’ Peacock [...]

[...] iLearn Technology » Bloom’s Taxonomy: Bloomin’ Peacock [...]

Kelly,
I have found this resource the day before I am supposed to give a PD day on HOTS and SMART. I absolutely love your resources and will be sharing with my colleagues-I need to spend more time here!
Thank you for sharing-you rock.

So glad you found it in time to be helpful!

[...] Next up, a visually pleasing peacock. I like the peacock concept a lot, though in some cases some of the tools are hard to read on the graphic, the original author has links to all of the tools she mentioned on her site. [...]

[...] Next up, a visually pleasing peacock. I like the peacock concept a lot, though in some cases some of the tools are hard to read on the graphic, the original author has links to all of the tools she mentioned on her site. [...]

[...] Blooming Peacock [...]

[...] and also on Kelly Tenkely’s iLearn Technology blog at  http://ilearntechnology.com/?p=2973 The traditional version also has six levels – Knowledge Comprehension Application Analysis [...]

[...] Next up, a visually pleasing peacock. I like the peacock concept a lot, though in some cases some of the tools are hard to read on the graphic, the original author has links to all of the tools she mentioned on her site. [...]

[…] website http://ilearntechnology.com/?p=2973 also has many great examples of web applications to fit each tier of Bloom’s Taxonomy in our […]

Do you still have the posters of the peacock? I would love to buy a set but can’t seem to find where.

Thank you!!

[…] instruction. There is much here about the actual processes of learning including a recent link “iLearn Technology” (http://ilearntechnology.com/?p=2973) and a blog with a wonderful visual representation of […]

Hi Amanda,
Yes, instead of hosting the files and selling directly myself, you can find them on Teachers Pay Teachers.

I love your blooming peacock. As you know, research shows that a learner is more likely to remember and use what they have learned if they have a visual representation and have experienced or played with the material. I think your peacock has some great tools for students to expand their thinking.

[…] Kelly Tenkely has produced a Livebinder of resources about the Digital Bloom’s Taxonomy. In addition to links to sites which explain and elaborate on Bloom’s Revised Digital Taxonomy for Higher Order Thinking in the classroom, there are also pages of further links for each level – with suggested activities and online tools or resources which can be used in schools. This includes her graphic visual “Bloom’s Taxonomy: Bloomin’ Peacock.” […]

[…] of inquiry and problem solving. Andrew Churches from Educational Origami and Kelly Tenkely from iLearn Technology have adapted Bloom’s Taxonomy to digital technology. Their ideas will help you determine how you […]

Where can our district purchase Blooms Posters???

Write a comment

*